Tag Archives: Microsoft Power BI

Power Query M Primer (part 3):
Functions: Function Values, Passing, Returning, Defining Inline, Recursion

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Not only can you define and invoke functions (as we covered in part 2), you can also pass them around. The ability to pass a function around without invoking it gives lots of flexibility.

Sounds complex? Yes, in words, but not necessarily in practice. If you’ve touched the Power Query M language, you’ve probably already passed functions around—just perhaps without realizing about it.

Then there’s the mysterious each. It shows up a lot in code generated by the query editor. What does it actually mean or do? Turns out, it’s a handy shortcut that can simplify code you write.

We have ground to cover. Let’s get going!
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Power Query M Primer (part 2):
Functions: Defining

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If you read part 1 in this series, you may have picked up a theme about expressions that produce values: A simple statement, like 1, is an expression that produces a value. let is also an expression that produces a value.

Guess what? A function is an expression that ultimately produces a value. Unlike the expressions we looked at last time, a function only produces this value when it’s invoked.

Usually, parameters are passed to a function when it’s invoked. The function can reference these inputs as it computes what it will return. Continue reading

Power Query M Primer (part 1):
Introduction, Simple Expressions & let

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Sooner or later, you may find yourself working directly with the Power Query M formula language. Tools like Microsoft Excel’s Get & Transform Data and Microsoft Power BI provide point-and-click interfaces allowing you to build data transformation sequences which behind-the-scenes are implemented in Power Query M. However, these query editors can’t do everything you might need. Sometimes direct editing and authoring of M is required.

Search the Internet and you’ll find many examples showing how to use this language to solve one problem or another but little is out there describing the syntax and paradigm of the language itself. A limited knowledge of these details may be insignificant when simply copying and pasting samples and editing variable and column names. Move beyond this to weaving and writing your own solutions directly in Power Query M and a solid understanding of the language’s syntax, rules and capabilities becomes most helpful.
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